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the sniffles so she will need another seven days of paid vacation. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers you have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self assessment outlying every possible health and safety hazard? >> yes. we're not just talking about heavy machinery but how you deal with specific stress with your age, gender, a doctor, the erwhelming majority of italian workers work with 10 or fewer employees. john: number 16 employee you have to have you representatives that is entitled to paid leave? >> eight hours per month. >> if you hire one more he must be disabled? >> number 16 the next one must be disabled or you pay the fine. john: 51st, 7% of payroll must be handicapped. >> 7% must qualify as disabled. rates of disability are pretty high. john: 101 employees, more rules. spain has reformed the stupid work rules that they no longer have to pay 42 months severance pay now it is just 24 months. that is still two years. >> if they turn out badly you will turn up and know them they show them two years. >> having 350,000 under severa
. as for the action in europe, really, the action focuses on italy where there's an impending political regime change. more on that in just a moment. the road map starts at the golden arches. mcdonald's blowing out expectations for november sales after the dismal drop in the month of october. hoping to fuel the rise, the bacon/onion/cheddar sandwich. >> there's one thing for certain, taxes on top earners are going up. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had thi
closing at 12:30. the nordic markets all closed for trades today. italy closed for trade. the smi closed for trade. we've got the ftse 1100 a couple of points higher. the cac and the ibex 35 just off marginal marginally, as well. i would like to show you what type of performance we've had on a year-to-date basis. rising somewhere in the region of 15% since the beginning of this year. you will note that we have had had a bit of a rally heading towards december. the question is whether we'll see that continue into next year. looking at a slightly broader base, the 600 index here, year-to-date higher by 15%, as well. europe's largest economy, the german market seeing some pretty significant gains as well as the dow jones stocks 50 up by 50%. so this brings its up, can it really continue next year? that's when you want to glance at barons, indicating over the weekend you could be looking at a rally. 20% next year. they singled out a number of stocks that they mentioned next year. by the way, andrew one look like one of the little elves in denmark dressed in my parents' garden. it's very swee
that means but italy has its own laws as you know, probably as well as anybody. but he wants -- he'd like to continue to run the show because he feels just like mario draghi that he's been very successful and he can't let go of the reins. now i understand that. but he doesn't want to run. >> he's been very successful and he tells us about that. >> right. >> he had his july 26th surprise between him and mario draghi but in the end as you pointed out off camera he doesn't want to lose. he's not going through the process in a way where he can lose. basically if you appoint me i'll take it. >> right. >> i think president obama or any politician in the u.s. would love to have those terms up. >> right. he wants the terms. no election. i don't want that process. i don't want the feeling of rejection but i'd like to continue in this path. italy has to make a decision and i think the big money will line up behind him. we see the reactions when berlusconi was on the rise for those two days the bond market got trashed again in italy and he's been out there talking this morning anyway. >> switching g
's happening with italian politics. of course, mario monti saying he was going to resign as italy's prime minister. that paves the way for flesh elections to be called in the beginning of next year. yesterday, we saw the negative reaction. sylvia berlusconi wants to make his return on the political scene. today, we saw a bounce back. if you can see see bind me, the bank stocks in italy rerebound, but it's only in the range of .5% to 1% of these names which were down in some cases nearly 10% yesterday. if you take a quick look at european bourses, if that's possible, down near the ftse mib, this is the one selling off somewhere in the range of 3.5% yesterday. today it's adding about .8%. in spain, showing a nice rebound. same attitude listing peripheral debt. we can take a look there. italy and spain seeing prices rise, yields falling to 4.75% and 5.75% respectively. is investor attention returning to spain? here is the thing. italy is the third biggest government debt market in the world. it's the third biggest economy in the eurozone. whatever happens with its political situation could p
was supposed to come to market. italy, oh, my, what happens when italy -- it turns out you had to take it down. i know that john corzine, very controversial figure. that's a code word. but what a trade they almost had. in the news again today. >> almost. >> horseshoes, hand grenades. >> we should point out, gm was certainly not having the easiest of times of it. this morning's stock is up sharply, we're telling you why. the company will buy back at a premium to at least what was the market price as of yesterday, 200 million shares from the government at $27.50. that having the effect of sending the stock above that. why not, if you're gm, you've got all this cash sitting on your balance sheet. you're earning virtually nothing on it, why not take the opportunity, even at a premium, to buy it back by as much as 11%, shrinking the cap by that much. we heard from tim massad who runs t.a.r.p., they'll be dribbling out the shares over time. the next 12 to 15 months. similar to the strategy employed with citi. a bit of it coming out. and finally they cleaned it up with a few big blocks. >> that was v
there are two that we're watching for american investors. one is greece, one is italy. the developments today are both good from an american investing perspective because they keep a lid on what's happening in those two respects. in greece there was trouble on the streets of athens last night as a result of left-wing protesters and students out and police using tear gas to disperse them as they protested the death of a teenager as a result of a police shooting four years ago, but the more important thing from a market perspective is that in 30 minutes' time now, the book will close on the greek debt buyback. now, remember what's happening here. the greek government is borrowing 10 billion euros from the rest of europe to buy back its own debt at a discount. if it does that successfully, by midday our time when that book closes, then more cash will flow through from the rest of europe, possibly next week it will be able to repay its bills and capitalize on the banks. let's check the close. >> the european markets are closing now. >> so we kind of went nowhere today. a lot of these markets in e
with italy up by about .2 of 1%. >> we'll do our best to keep focused on the business day. we'll be following the tragic shooting in connecticut, of course. the new york stock exchange will hold a moment of silence to honor the victims in the next few moments, and we'll be looking at the president's call for meaningful action and the politics of gun control. >> let's get to a road map for this morning. it starts with apple. under pressure once again. even dipping below $500 a share at some point this morning. shares will remain range bound near term. iphone 5 sales and cannibalization among the region. >> other concessions from the gop, the speaker proposing tax hikes for millionaires. could this be the tipping point. moving the talks beyond deadlock. >> a big week for earnings. yes, earnings. fedex, research in motion among the companies reporting. so finally maybe we'll be talking about fundamentals in the stock market more than just the cliff. we've got to talk about apple reversing its move lower this morning, sold more than 2 million iphone 5s in china. the best debut for any iphone in t
and italy. the boreses and footy 100, the xetra dax, this has been the outperformer up in the range of 30%. another .3% after the ifo out of germany. came in better than expected. again, a good sign for growth. not necessarily, though, for those who would like to see a weaker europe. the ibex 35 adding 1.3%. and the nikkei, as you mentioned, up above 10,000 for the first time in eight months. adding 2.4%. better hope the moves in the japanese government or bank of japan pan out. we'll get the bank of japan's decision tomorrow. but this comes on the day when, remember, it's on the weakening of the yen which we can show you on hopes that that will help the japanese corporate sector. remember, we saw export figures showing a drop of 20% in exports to the use. 15% to china. again, there's a lot of expectation built to this. the aussie/dollar remains the underperformer as we continue to evaluate china's internal rebalancing. now the sterling is stronger, the dollar/yen you already mentioned. and the euro/dollar to get back to the point about the ifo survey is adding .3% to 132.-- 1.3274. we ge
back as we're talking, rallied back quite a bit in the ten-year bond futures in italy but you know what, politics aside, mario draghi bought himself and europe some time. i don't know what they'll do with it, it will be 2013's story. >> you nailed it, to me every strategy since the crisis hit in this country in my opinion you could call it kick the can but it's about we have no idea what the effects are going to be, what the exit will be or if any of this is going to work but trying to buy time for something to happen. that something has to be growth and i still don't see how europe has a plan for more growth. >> we know greece is done with because they've already restructured their debt and what they did in the last two weeks, which the germans said they should do, they should have done three years ago they'd be better off. spain is the immediate problem, you have 26% unemployment which is non-performing loans. >> we have to go, 2,200 pages of health care, i'm sure the notes spain's taken how greece has got money at every turn, their pile is a bigger pile than the health care plan. >>
. >> the european markets are closing now. >> remember yesterday and all that concern we had about where italy might go with the resignation of mario monti. greece is higher. por sh gal is higher. spain is higher. it's a good day for -- investor sentiment.strongly it was revealed today. optimism over what the fed is going to do in the united states tomorrow. optimism there will be a deal on the fiscal cliff. you have optimism that the recapitalization of the banks is going to be delayed by another year according to the bank of italy. and you have optimism as well on mar of election promises as we now face the pros wekt of a much earlier election in italy. to that end it is fascinating. sylvia berlusconi has come out today warning about the germano center of politics. in other words, too much of a focus on what is happening from germany and the austerity inspired by angela merkel. in particular, he is drawing attention to this. which is the spread of the extra that investors demand to hold italian bonds over german bonds. i've shown this to you a couple times. over the last year it's been a mainstay
of comments about what happens happening in europe and the need to liberalize the taxi systems in italy and so forth. are you comfortable with the system you have now in new york? i understand the medallion changes hands for $800,000. so you have a few people who control a lot of these licenses. who are creaming off most of the profits. then you have often first generation immigrants who are tearing around on the street 12-hour days trying to make a living? is that fair? >> medallion now trades for $1 million. so i think that does prove your point in a sense. look, we are -- the biggest issue in new york city is outside the core service area in midtown, downtown manhattan. mayor bloomberg has gotten legislation out to let us create a whole separate class of taxis that will operate in the boroughs. we do need more cabs. that $1 million price -- >> did it get approved? >> the governor signed it, the taxi owners, they have a lot at stake. they've sued and it's in court now. we're going to get a final decision by may or june. i'm sure we're going to win and put the new meltions on the street. >> d
that was in terrible shape to begin with and i think you have a lot of austerity fatigue going on spain, italy, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how should people be thinking about this? the average american, and they've been hearing about it for so long and they're not sure it will affect their pocketbook. do you think they will? >> and there's this incredible chance that greece will leave and the dominos will begin to fall. i think that's unluikely to happen as long as the ecb is willing to support that currency, but will it thrive? will those economies boom? i don't think so, i think it will be another year of recession and you will find individual opportunities and the stock picker's market and far as it's a strong growth, they're not there yet. >> thanks so much
in their economy, if not a recession. >> yes. you can see it in italy. you can see it in japan. the reason for that is that the number of workers supporting the proportionate number of retirees to ross over time. there simply is not as much money being kicked into a system. stuart: japan has a far bigger debt than any european country and far bigger than the united states. i think that is true as a proportion of the gdp. >> when you add all the debt to gather, the figure is far higher. in fact, it is closer to 500% of gdp. stuart: hold on, let's get back to america. we have a lower birthrate. the loss in american history. but don't we also have mass immigration, which makes up, i think, for a lower birthrate. our population still experience. we are nowhere near the japan issue, really. >> this is the beginning of another step that reinforces the fact that we are headed down the same path. japan has had eight failed fiscal stimulus programs. we have had three or four, depending on how you count them. at what point, do we stop in washington and say we may have a fundamental problem here. the
back. david apollo is on loan from italy, it's in d.c. now, and to find out why david apollo is totally into politics, you have to check out my must read, it's on my facebook page, at facebook.com/janico. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. it's so great to see you. you, too! oh, cloudy glasses. you didn't have to come over! actually, honey, i think i did... oh? you did? whoa, ladies, easy. hi. cascade kitchen counselor. we can help avoid this with cascade complete pacs. see, over time, cascade complete pacs fight film buildup two times better than finish quantum. to help leave glasses sparkling shiny! too bad it doesn't work on windows. okay, i'm outta here. cascade. the
ready with unlimited support for spain and italy, when and if they sign on to oversight agreements. these are huge dramatic changes. think about how many times we've agonized over where the money would come from for bailing out spain and italy. now we know. when they sign on to oversight. >> the point is we know -- we know what the policy response already is by the ecb and the feds. so what is going to be the next catalyst to keep the markets to those new highs you're talking about? >> the next big catalyst is obviously the fiscal cliff resolution, second, you have spain sign on to oversight from the ecb. remove any possibility of spanish default and we think that lagarde is signaling that the conditions to that oversight will be a lot about labor market reforms. those are growth enhancing, so that's another great catalyst for the market. last, but certainly not least, i think you could see the new leadership team in china come more aggressive reform program than people are expecting. >> all right. michael, good to have you. >> thank you so much. >> michael jones of riverfront. >>
much better. you throw up the bund. many areas whether you talk italy or indeed greece, rates are moving down. that isn't a bad thing for funding but it does ehave peopl look at spain saying they'll do bank bailout, old program, not country bailout new program. the correction was small. goldman says stocks are the place to be. kind of making this trade a little more true than it was on its knee jerk. if you look at putting it together. you can see we're up several basis points. still not huge. if you open it up to a one-month chart, you can see that 160 remains the pivot. it's still about europe. don't despair. i'm sure the red herring of bashing tax policy in the u.s. will get to the front page before the end of the session. >> thank you very much. let's check out latest news in energy and medals with sharon epperson. >> it's the euro that we see in euro dollar helping commodities and risk on trade across the board in the sector. the fact that we are looking at that euro dollar and above 130 level is significant. also keep in mind that we did get improving factory activity. t
. for example italy managed to auction some debt today, the longer end of the market. and there was no great move. can we have a look at that? there was no great move of the ten-year yield as a result. maybe we'll come back in a moment. let's just focus on the close out. >> the european markets are closing now. >> it is negative territory as you can see. the fiscal cliff of course plays a part in that taking some of those -- in many senses you could call it profit taking -- not in the case of spain where you see a major underperformance. >> let me say the german finance minister suggested he thought the worst of the eurozone crisis is now past. he said the government in athens knows it cannot financially over burden the rest of the eurozone countries and is acting as it should. he was optimistic on france as well despite the fact the data is indicating we'll still get a contraction in the third quarter, for most of the eurozone. germany's economic position is arguably deteriorating but still schauble there is relatively optimistic that the crisis is over. in the meantime what is also happeni
. with that singing. >> wa part of italy, do you know? >> cosanza is the town. it's the foot of the boot. >> not a bad part of italy. >> no, there's really not. >> bob, help us here. >> i don't know if i can. >> you've got to. >> rise above, bob. >> just explain the volatility issue at a minimum. where do we go over the next two days of trading? we have today, we have monday and obviously we don't have tuesday. >> well, i don't know that we do a whole lot. i believe markets are just on the sidelines since before the start of the holidays for the most part. i believe there were some people holding out waiting for a fiscal cliff solution. i think we're going over the cliff, but we're grabbing one of those cartoon roots sticking out as we go over it. i think it will be a matter of days before just the political pressure of going over the cliff causes them to do about a 12-month deal. it's just -- i don't know. i hesitate to say the word ridiculous, but it's just ridiculous to watch. so market participants, the short-term market participants are on the sidelines. i think we're looking at about a 12-month
investors, not so sure. i wanted to show you the italian curve, italy and spanl wrapping up their fund-raising for the year. their auctions weren't all of that huge, but we are seeing yields fall, prices rise across the board as investors did show up. if we flip over to spain in particular, we can take a look at the three-year over here. a bid to cover ratio of 4.8%. one indication certainly of the kind of indications there are where the ecb is expected to be the most active if and when these countries have to access their bailout programs. now we're seeing prices in spain sell off a little bit. the ten-year, just under 5.4% is the level there. for the longer dated papers, investors are a little bit more wary. now, that news coming out of the euro group meeting, i wanted to show you the euro/dollar as we wrap up today's global market support. it's still down .1%, 1.3056. that would tell you that the resolution is largely priced in. now as focus moves into the start of next year, a couple of the key questions will be how much mario draghi follows ben bernan bernanke's caps, maybe even c
't get them. i'm talking about bond markets. you see how spain, italy traded. so we're kind of nervous. the street is kind of out of paper so they can't screw it up right now. oh, shoot. i forgot to say hi to my mom! hi, mom! so that's important. because she'll get really mad if i don't. so, you have -- so you have -- >> you haven't said anything bad yet. it all sounds good. >> i'll tell you bad stuff if you want to hear it. >> no, we don't want to hear it. >> bottom line, joe, there's a trillion dollars, you got more money coming in of stimulus, and i got this market next year. so i got all kinds of different markets right now. i got credit markets which we know a lot about. we're really big equity guys, too. and i got equity markets like credit markets. i got credit markets that are so -- they're not -- i wouldn't say they're in bubble territory, but they're rich. and the spreads are at pretty good levels right now. you know, and i'll tell you how rich they are. you know this country, ivory coast, cote d'ivoire, to speak french although my french accent sucks, we bought this paper, i
, italy, france and the uk. this comes one day after a federal judge denied a request by apple to ban u.s. sales of samsung smart phone models. the devices in questions are the ones that a jury back in august say illegally used apple technology. at that time apple had been awarded $1.1 billion in damages. >>> the markets, dow looks like it will open up about $68 points higher. s&p up about 10 points, the nasdaq up 22.5 points coming on some of this news that we may be getting closer on the fiscal cliff. let's check out what's going on in asia. hang seng was down off marginally. shanghai composite up marginally and the nikkei up as well. quickly in europe, you can take a look at what's going on there. the ftse up about 0.38%. cac flat, and the german dax up about 0.5. >> the white house is proposing a new deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. let's get to steve liesman with more of the details. >> you're surprised, aren't you? >> isn't it happening. >> soon as they want it done they can do it. >> you said it this morning. it's a fictitious thing. we're going to show you the movement in just a
in italy, germany is down by .9%. >> of course, futures as you saw are taking a hit on concerns that a deal will not be reached to avert that fiscal cliff. an attempt by house speaker boehner to avoid that class and pass the so-called plan b tax bill. that failed. the measure that would have kept current tax rates for those making less than $1 million a year. it never even made it to the house floor. speaker boehner is scheduled to hold a news conference about an hour from now. of course, we'll bring that to you live. >> here we are. >> here we are once again. >> there was no real plan b. there was no real possibility of this. the republicans, the vast majority signed a pledge, they will not vote for tax increase. who would think they would suddenly turn around and vote for a tax increase. they pledged not to. >> the speaker said they might. >> i don't care. >> unless it's some sort of a plan to show how he's really -- you know, you've got to negotiate harder. because look what i'm dealing with. >> these guys -- do you suddenly think they're saying, all of a sudden we're for taxes. no tax i
the aviation business of italy's avio for $4.3 billion. ge is trying to expand its participation in the jet propulsion market. they were once owned by fiat and is now controlled by a european private equity firm and research in motion reported a smaller than expected also for its latest quarter. the stock is under pressure as the company saw its first-ever drop in its subscriber rolls and said it would be changing its fee structure. that is something that brings in more than a third of the nephew. it's been seen as the one real stable piece of that business. we do have the ceo thorsten heins. he'll be joining us in just about 30 minutes to talk more about this. >> there's only ten days left now to prevent automatic tack hikes and spending cuts. joining us from washington, republican congresswoman shelly moore capito. were you privy to everything that was happening yesterday? >> i was shocked when we went into the conference at 7:45 and the speaker, after offering this serenity prayer, said merry christmas, you're going home, we're not putting the vote up, we don't have the votes. i was disa
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